Econometrics
Simpson’s Paradox

Simpson’s Paradox

In 1951 Edward Simpson published a paper discussing the interpretation of contingency tables. He discusses a phenomenon that is still occurring in today’s statistics. It is called after his own name, Simpson’s Paradox.  An Example Simpson’s Paradox can be...

The Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test

The Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test

In statistics we are often estimating parameters and then, using some hypothesis test, we can find out if we should either reject our null hypothesis or not. Now in these tests we almost always rely on some known distribution of a so-called test statistic. Let us...

Is OLS a thing of the past?

Is OLS a thing of the past?

[latexpage] One of the most popular regression methods an econometrician learns is the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS). It is a simple and elegant way of estimating parameters in linear regression. However, there is another technique to perform linear regression using...

The medical test paradox

The medical test paradox

[latexpage] Testing has been quite a significant subject during this pandemic. Around 30.000 people a day are being tested in the Netherlands alone, so it is quite important that such a test can accurately predict whether someone actually has the disease. However, an...

Reversion to mediocrity

Reversion to mediocrity

Nowadays, research in many fields involves statistics. Whether it comes down to a government's decisions on measures fighting a pandemic or the Red Bull formula 1 racing team deciding on whether Verstappen should swap tires in the next lap, it sounds like a good idea...

Main partner

Find out about your career possibilities!